GENERATOR VOLTAGE REGULATORS

 

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QUESTIONS or want to place a PHONE ORDER

Please call us toll free at (866)321-6855 or e-mail us at
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We sell only original equipment generator voltage regulators, that we buy directly from the manufacturer.

When you buy a generator voltage regulator from us, you can rest assured that you'll receive a name brand regulator, built, and backed by the biggest names in the industry.

We stock a full line of generator voltage regulators from Marathon, and Newage (ONAN).

 

WE'LL SHIP YOUR GENERATOR VOLTAGE REGULATOR TODAY

AND UPS GROUND  SHIPPING IS FREE, THAT'S RIGHT...FREE SHIPPING

(Orders placed by 09:00AM PST M-F ship the same day, all other orders ship the next business day)

 

GENERATOR VOLTAGE REGULATOR PRICES

MARATHON VOLTAGE REGULATORS

MARATHON SE350 P/N 761594-01  $255.00

MARATHON DVR2000E P/N D-528258 $987.00

 

HOW VOLTAGE REGULATORS AND BRUSHLESS GENERATORS WORK

Customers often ask, just what does a generator voltage regulator do, how does it work? How does a brushless generator work?

A voltage regulator does, just what it's name implies, it regulates the output voltage of the generator. It does this using a very small portion of the generators output, and converting that AC voltage into a DC current that is inversely proportional to the generators output voltage (once it reaches full voltage). Basically, the more voltage output of the generator, the less DC current the voltage regulator produces.

A brushless generator consists of a part that spins called an armature, this is most often connected to your engines flywheel, and a part that doesn't spin, this is called the stator. When the engine starts to spin the armature, residual magnetism in the armature induces a small voltage in the output windings of the stator, most often over 10 volts, but not allot more.

This voltage is converted to a DC current by the voltage regulator, which is connected to a second set of windings in the stator, called the exciter windings. This DC current in the exciter windings forms an electro magnet, which induces an ac current in the matching exciter windings in the armature. The exciter windings in the armature are connected to units called rotating rectifiers which convert (rectify) the AC current into DC current.

The DC output of the rotating rectifiers  is connected to the main windings in the armature.  This current creates an electro magnet in the armature, which induces a  larger voltage into the output windings of the stator. The voltage regulator uses this increased voltage to produce more DC current, and the cycle continues until the generator  reaches full operating voltage.

When the generator output reaches full operating voltage, the generator voltage regulator reduces the amount of DC current that it produces, thus in effect lowering the output voltage of the generator. At the correct output voltage, with a non changing load on the generator, the voltage regulator comes into a state of equilibrium where it produces just enough current to keep the generator producing the correct output voltage.

If you add load to the generator, the first thing that happens is that the output voltage drops a little. The generator voltage regulator increases the amount of current it produces, raising the voltage back to it's proper level. If you reduce the load on the generator, just the opposite occurs. The output voltage goes up, and the voltage regulator reduces the amount of DC current that it produces, and the voltage drops.

 

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